Cold bluing kit?

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Stakebed
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Body Type: Grainbox
Model Year: 1929
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Cold bluing kit?

Post by Stakebed » July 25th, 2014, 10:24 pm

Ive heard you can cold blue things like brake rollers and pins and such that just arent practical to paint.

Does anyone know of a kit or some other way to prevent the pins and rollers from rusting up(and springs i suppose)?

Or what have you guys done?

Reds34
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Joined: May 15th, 2010, 2:34 pm
Body Type: dump
Model Year: 1930
Location: Eastern, CT

Re: Cold bluing kit?

Post by Reds34 » July 26th, 2014, 6:27 am

You could look into bluing kits for gun parts, I don't know how long it would last though.

Red

Bob C
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Body Type: Mail truck, Stake tr
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Re: Cold bluing kit?

Post by Bob C » July 26th, 2014, 8:49 am

You might try this place. http://www.caswellplating.com/

Bob

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1crosscut
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Re: Cold bluing kit?

Post by 1crosscut » July 26th, 2014, 12:03 pm

If you are specifically interested in keepingt he inside workings of the brake mechanisms from rusting just giving the parts a rub down with a rag that has some grease saturated into it. A small sheen of grease on these parts should last a long time in keeping things rust free. That is unless you are doing some serious all weather driving and getting the insides of your brake drums soaked on a regular basis.
Now for other stuff that I want to keep rust and tarnish free that are not painted like head studs and nuts, bodys of spark plugs, all the brass parts on my carburator etc... I use Penitrol straight out of the can. Penitrol is a paint additive that makes paint flow better when using a brush or sponge. It is also is listed on the label as a being a metal protectant. Several of my hit and miss engines have the faces of the flywheels bare steel with no paint at all and the Penitrol has kept them rust free for many years now. You can get it at any hardware store.
Dave
------------
Dave

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John Losch
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Joined: May 7th, 2014, 3:58 pm
Body Type: 82b stake bed
Model Year: 1930
Location: Holliston, MA

Re: Cold bluing kit?

Post by John Losch » July 26th, 2014, 12:23 pm

From time to time I have used a compound generically known as "rust converter" available in many auto parts stores. It is intended to chemically convert rust into a stable condition, at the same time leaving a black coating where it is applied. Normally it is intended to be used before priming and painting surfaces that have rusted. Several years ago I coated part of the frame of an iron welding bench that stands outside my barn, and the surface remained black and rust-free for over four years with no additional coating of any kind. It might be worth a try for the purpose you have in mind.

Cold gun blue will color metal (even non-ferrous metals) but it offers no rust protection or barrier. It has to be coated with oil or some other protective coating. In fact, if not coated it will hasten rust on iron and steel.

John Losch

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Chris Haynes
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Location: North Hills, CA/ Pine Grove, CA

Re: Cold bluing kit?

Post by Chris Haynes » July 26th, 2014, 1:46 pm

Parkerizing is the way to go. You can buy Parkerizing chemicals on eBay. It is good for all of your hardware.

Stakebed
Posts: 1187
Joined: June 14th, 2007, 7:29 pm
Body Type: Grainbox
Model Year: 1929
Location: Illinois

Re: Cold bluing kit?

Post by Stakebed » July 26th, 2014, 3:16 pm

1crosscut wrote:If you are specifically interested in keepingt he inside workings of the brake mechanisms from rusting just giving the parts a rub down with a rag that has some grease saturated into it. A small sheen of grease on these parts should last a long time in keeping things rust free. That is unless you are doing some serious all weather driving and getting the insides of your brake drums soaked on a regular basis.
Now for other stuff that I want to keep rust and tarnish free that are not painted like head studs and nuts, bodys of spark plugs, all the brass parts on my carburator etc... I use Penitrol straight out of the can. Penitrol is a paint additive that makes paint flow better when using a brush or sponge. It is also is listed on the label as a being a metal protectant. Several of my hit and miss engines have the faces of the flywheels bare steel with no paint at all and the Penitrol has kept them rust free for many years now. You can get it at any hardware store.
Dave
yea i was considering putting a light coat of grease and or antisieze on parts. i dont plan to drive in the rain or snow or deep water.

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spectria
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Body Type: Mail Truck, Stakebed
Model Year: 1931
Location: Quincy, Ca.

Re: Cold bluing kit?

Post by spectria » July 26th, 2014, 3:40 pm

Stakebed wrote: yea i was considering putting a light coat of grease and or anti seize on parts. i dont plan to drive in the rain or snow or deep water.
I've used anti-seize on backing plates, for linkage, adjusters, bolts and hardware in all makes of braking system for years (thousands of vehicles). The only down side is it dries up and won't prevent rust or corrosion, it just leaves a graphite coating. It will make it easier to tear down but it won't keep things pretty.
Grease and Penitrol are effective too...

Parkerizing is something you can do yourself, very effective and looks good.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parkerizing
Dave in Quincy, Ca. I love Pics!!!! Post them All!!! :)
Join the Ford Model AA Truck Club - membership form at http://www.fmaatc.org

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BrianT
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Re: Cold bluing kit?

Post by BrianT » July 27th, 2014, 8:02 am

Stakebed,
Follow Crosscuts suggestion, and also use the white Lithium grease on all metal to metal parts, it as been used for many years in the auto industry in this application, ------ and if you really want to keep things rust free you could pump lots of grease thru the brake cam zerk fitting, ---- as Ford admitted a bad idea which was also discontinued along with the hub bearing zerk a few years later.

Stakebed
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Re: Cold bluing kit?

Post by Stakebed » July 27th, 2014, 10:56 am

BrianT wrote:Stakebed,
Follow Crosscuts suggestion, and also use the white Lithium grease on all metal to metal parts, it as been used for many years in the auto industry in this application, ------ and if you really want to keep things rust free you could pump lots of grease thru the brake cam zerk fitting, ---- as Ford admitted a bad idea which was also discontinued along with the hub bearing zerk a few years later.
yea that cam zerk is an awful idea.... it would only grease like the top half of half the bushing haha.

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BrianT
Posts: 248
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Body Type: 82A
Model Year: 1929
Location: San Diego, California

Re: Cold bluing kit?

Post by BrianT » July 27th, 2014, 11:41 am

Stakebed wrote:
BrianT wrote:Stakebed,
Follow Crosscuts suggestion, and also use the white Lithium grease on all metal to metal parts, it as been used for many years in the auto industry in this application, ------ and if you really want to keep things rust free you could pump lots of grease thru the brake cam zerk fitting, ---- as Ford admitted a bad idea which was also discontinued along with the hub bearing zerk a few years later.
yea that cam zerk is an awful idea.... it would only grease like the top half of half the bushing haha.
Stakebed
That's not the worst part, -- although most of them are plugged up anyway causing no harm -- can you imagine in the day some person pumping grease waiting for it to come out somewhere.

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